TIMESHARE
TIMESHARE

July 8 - July 17, 2016 at Present Company, Brooklyn
Curated by Jacquelyn Strycker

The word “timeshare” conjures thoughts of vacation homes– collectively owned properties that each owner takes possession of for a couple weeks each year. And, indeed, for seven weeks this summer, the twelve artists, all members of the SVA MFA Art Practice Class of 2017, temporarily claim NYC as their home.

TIMESHARE contemplates a collective and temporary possession of place. The artists address themes of transition, memory and artifact and consider place as a multidisciplinary construct for cultural inquiry.

 Qinmin Liu’s “Dream Dia #1” is at once appealing and revolting– a glittering, noisy carnival attraction seemingly plucked from a street fair and placed in the entranceway of the gallery.

Qinmin Liu’s “Dream Dia #1” is at once appealing and revolting– a glittering, noisy carnival attraction seemingly plucked from a street fair and placed in the entranceway of the gallery.

 Tzirel Kaminetzky’s “Soft Archive,” a sculpture of large scale iPhone photos that are at once stunning and mundane, and Sarah Brewington’s “Present,” a nonspecific cityscape constructed from images on mirrors captured on expired film, scanned and printed, both have an implacability.

Tzirel Kaminetzky’s “Soft Archive,” a sculpture of large scale iPhone photos that are at once stunning and mundane, and Sarah Brewington’s “Present,” a nonspecific cityscape constructed from images on mirrors captured on expired film, scanned and printed, both have an implacability.

31020346106_62f4b3c568_k.jpg
 Nancy Gruver Van Wagoner’s scroll, “Tapestry of Oxidation of the Ocean,” a textile printed with a collage of iron oxides that were present billions of years ago invokes both the beginning and the end of the world.

Nancy Gruver Van Wagoner’s scroll, “Tapestry of Oxidation of the Ocean,” a textile printed with a collage of iron oxides that were present billions of years ago invokes both the beginning and the end of the world.

 Dee Solin’s “CYBO” brings us to a past future as it summons a 1950’s science fiction vision of the future.

Dee Solin’s “CYBO” brings us to a past future as it summons a 1950’s science fiction vision of the future.

 “Mended Pieces,” Benjamin Quesnel’s tobacco farm barn refuse assemblage, substantial and solid, yet precariously hung, at first seems wistful for a past Americana, but then turns cynical as we gaze through a window looking onto an opaque white wall.

“Mended Pieces,” Benjamin Quesnel’s tobacco farm barn refuse assemblage, substantial and solid, yet precariously hung, at first seems wistful for a past Americana, but then turns cynical as we gaze through a window looking onto an opaque white wall.

 Monika Lin’s “Shanghai Stories” is a dirty river comprising woodblock prints, acrylic cut shapes, and delicate animations on branded tablet screens made in Chinese factories, connects traditional Chinese practices with the contemporary manufacturing landscape in Shanghai.

Monika Lin’s “Shanghai Stories” is a dirty river comprising woodblock prints, acrylic cut shapes, and delicate animations on branded tablet screens made in Chinese factories, connects traditional Chinese practices with the contemporary manufacturing landscape in Shanghai.

 Roma Pas’ “Untitled (Beggars Can Be Choosers),” a digital photo collage adhered to corrugated cardboard and propped upon cinderblocks considers the relationship between physical and digital space.

Roma Pas’ “Untitled (Beggars Can Be Choosers),” a digital photo collage adhered to corrugated cardboard and propped upon cinderblocks considers the relationship between physical and digital space.

 Todd Hainline’s “Folded Space,” calling to mind both celestial orbs and cellular life forms, is a mediation on transmutation.

Todd Hainline’s “Folded Space,” calling to mind both celestial orbs and cellular life forms, is a mediation on transmutation.

 Christine Stiver’s “Britchin,” a headless horsewoman perched atop a painted pony, simultaneously whimsical and brutal, operates in the space between the perverse and the poetic.

Christine Stiver’s “Britchin,” a headless horsewoman perched atop a painted pony, simultaneously whimsical and brutal, operates in the space between the perverse and the poetic.

 Connor Kelly’s “f*@ck me she’s gorgeous” leaves us with remnants from a night out– phone numbers and solicitations scribbled with lipstick on napkins, a sexy anticipation that is ultimately unfulfilled, a letdown of make-up smeared napkins in the wash basin.

Connor Kelly’s “f*@ck me she’s gorgeous” leaves us with remnants from a night out– phone numbers and solicitations scribbled with lipstick on napkins, a sexy anticipation that is ultimately unfulfilled, a letdown of make-up smeared napkins in the wash basin.

 Kyle Browne’s “Charting the Bear Cages,” a constructed archive of a cartographer’s studio, appears to be an interrupted process, but is in fact, a finished object, creating a tension between a pause and a terminus.

Kyle Browne’s “Charting the Bear Cages,” a constructed archive of a cartographer’s studio, appears to be an interrupted process, but is in fact, a finished object, creating a tension between a pause and a terminus.

 TIMESHARE is curated by Jacquelyn Strycker and includes work by Sarah Brewington, Kyle Browne, Todd Hainline, Tzirel Kaminetzky, Connor Kelly, Monika Lin, Qinmin Liu, Roma Pas, Benjamin Quesnel, Dee Solin, Christine Stiver and Nancy Gruver Van Wagoner.

TIMESHARE is curated by Jacquelyn Strycker and includes work by Sarah Brewington, Kyle Browne, Todd Hainline, Tzirel Kaminetzky, Connor Kelly, Monika Lin, Qinmin Liu, Roma Pas, Benjamin Quesnel, Dee Solin, Christine Stiver and Nancy Gruver Van Wagoner.

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TIMESHARE
 Qinmin Liu’s “Dream Dia #1” is at once appealing and revolting– a glittering, noisy carnival attraction seemingly plucked from a street fair and placed in the entranceway of the gallery.
 Tzirel Kaminetzky’s “Soft Archive,” a sculpture of large scale iPhone photos that are at once stunning and mundane, and Sarah Brewington’s “Present,” a nonspecific cityscape constructed from images on mirrors captured on expired film, scanned and printed, both have an implacability.
31020346106_62f4b3c568_k.jpg
 Nancy Gruver Van Wagoner’s scroll, “Tapestry of Oxidation of the Ocean,” a textile printed with a collage of iron oxides that were present billions of years ago invokes both the beginning and the end of the world.
 Dee Solin’s “CYBO” brings us to a past future as it summons a 1950’s science fiction vision of the future.
 “Mended Pieces,” Benjamin Quesnel’s tobacco farm barn refuse assemblage, substantial and solid, yet precariously hung, at first seems wistful for a past Americana, but then turns cynical as we gaze through a window looking onto an opaque white wall.
 Monika Lin’s “Shanghai Stories” is a dirty river comprising woodblock prints, acrylic cut shapes, and delicate animations on branded tablet screens made in Chinese factories, connects traditional Chinese practices with the contemporary manufacturing landscape in Shanghai.
 Roma Pas’ “Untitled (Beggars Can Be Choosers),” a digital photo collage adhered to corrugated cardboard and propped upon cinderblocks considers the relationship between physical and digital space.
 Todd Hainline’s “Folded Space,” calling to mind both celestial orbs and cellular life forms, is a mediation on transmutation.
 Christine Stiver’s “Britchin,” a headless horsewoman perched atop a painted pony, simultaneously whimsical and brutal, operates in the space between the perverse and the poetic.
 Connor Kelly’s “f*@ck me she’s gorgeous” leaves us with remnants from a night out– phone numbers and solicitations scribbled with lipstick on napkins, a sexy anticipation that is ultimately unfulfilled, a letdown of make-up smeared napkins in the wash basin.
 Kyle Browne’s “Charting the Bear Cages,” a constructed archive of a cartographer’s studio, appears to be an interrupted process, but is in fact, a finished object, creating a tension between a pause and a terminus.
 TIMESHARE is curated by Jacquelyn Strycker and includes work by Sarah Brewington, Kyle Browne, Todd Hainline, Tzirel Kaminetzky, Connor Kelly, Monika Lin, Qinmin Liu, Roma Pas, Benjamin Quesnel, Dee Solin, Christine Stiver and Nancy Gruver Van Wagoner.
30300326431_456cc3c5fb_k.jpg
30386324315_60395ce488_k.jpg
30386324505_73130abc70_k.jpg
30386324665_f36d1004dd_k.jpg
30913748642_c89c5675e4_k.jpg
29754746923_31f9ff3231_k.jpg
31055990535_8ca5c7d15d_k.jpg
30386323915_e578ae6f23_k.jpg
30300330771_9d8a4f3e27_k.jpg
TIMESHARE

July 8 - July 17, 2016 at Present Company, Brooklyn
Curated by Jacquelyn Strycker

The word “timeshare” conjures thoughts of vacation homes– collectively owned properties that each owner takes possession of for a couple weeks each year. And, indeed, for seven weeks this summer, the twelve artists, all members of the SVA MFA Art Practice Class of 2017, temporarily claim NYC as their home.

TIMESHARE contemplates a collective and temporary possession of place. The artists address themes of transition, memory and artifact and consider place as a multidisciplinary construct for cultural inquiry.

Qinmin Liu’s “Dream Dia #1” is at once appealing and revolting– a glittering, noisy carnival attraction seemingly plucked from a street fair and placed in the entranceway of the gallery.

Tzirel Kaminetzky’s “Soft Archive,” a sculpture of large scale iPhone photos that are at once stunning and mundane, and Sarah Brewington’s “Present,” a nonspecific cityscape constructed from images on mirrors captured on expired film, scanned and printed, both have an implacability.

Nancy Gruver Van Wagoner’s scroll, “Tapestry of Oxidation of the Ocean,” a textile printed with a collage of iron oxides that were present billions of years ago invokes both the beginning and the end of the world.

Dee Solin’s “CYBO” brings us to a past future as it summons a 1950’s science fiction vision of the future.

“Mended Pieces,” Benjamin Quesnel’s tobacco farm barn refuse assemblage, substantial and solid, yet precariously hung, at first seems wistful for a past Americana, but then turns cynical as we gaze through a window looking onto an opaque white wall.

Monika Lin’s “Shanghai Stories” is a dirty river comprising woodblock prints, acrylic cut shapes, and delicate animations on branded tablet screens made in Chinese factories, connects traditional Chinese practices with the contemporary manufacturing landscape in Shanghai.

Roma Pas’ “Untitled (Beggars Can Be Choosers),” a digital photo collage adhered to corrugated cardboard and propped upon cinderblocks considers the relationship between physical and digital space.

Todd Hainline’s “Folded Space,” calling to mind both celestial orbs and cellular life forms, is a mediation on transmutation.

Christine Stiver’s “Britchin,” a headless horsewoman perched atop a painted pony, simultaneously whimsical and brutal, operates in the space between the perverse and the poetic.

Connor Kelly’s “f*@ck me she’s gorgeous” leaves us with remnants from a night out– phone numbers and solicitations scribbled with lipstick on napkins, a sexy anticipation that is ultimately unfulfilled, a letdown of make-up smeared napkins in the wash basin.

Kyle Browne’s “Charting the Bear Cages,” a constructed archive of a cartographer’s studio, appears to be an interrupted process, but is in fact, a finished object, creating a tension between a pause and a terminus.

TIMESHARE is curated by Jacquelyn Strycker and includes work by Sarah Brewington, Kyle Browne, Todd Hainline, Tzirel Kaminetzky, Connor Kelly, Monika Lin, Qinmin Liu, Roma Pas, Benjamin Quesnel, Dee Solin, Christine Stiver and Nancy Gruver Van Wagoner.

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